Pointe Shoe Products

Pointe Shoe Products: Bunheads Ouch Pouch Jr.

Cassady from Motion Unlimited Dancewear shares one more pointe shoe product with us this month…the “Ouch Pouch Jr.”…

Ouch Pouch Jr./Color

 

This is by far our best selling toe pad!  With a thin layer of gel inside a fabric pouch, this pad will be your best friend.  They easily stretch over your toes to give you all-over padding that you need–and nothing extra to take up space in your shoes.

The Ouch Pouch Jr. comes in two different sizes so it can fit every foot.  The small sizes fit small or narrow feet and the large fits larger or wider feet. You can even cut it down to make it the perfect fit. It hugs toes nicely and does not stick to the skin like most gel pads. They are easy to clean and last throughout many pairs of pointe shoes. You can even get them in three reversible color combinations!

With comfy padding like this, you won’t need much else to keep your feet happy.

Plain Ouch Pouch Jr.

Order your own Ouch Pouch Jr. (Plain/LG)

Order a color Ouch Pouch Jr. (LG)

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Pointe Shoe Products: Daniel’s Pointe Shoe Glue

Cassady from Motion Unlimited Dancewear is back with us today to talk about another pointe shoe product–pointe shoe glue…

Daniel's Pointe Shoe Glue

Everybody knows pointe shoes are expensive! For most people, it’s important to try to preserve them as long as they can.  There have been many tricks out there, but the best seems to be gluing them. Of course you can use many types of glue, but the very best has to be Daniel’s Pointe Shoe glue.

Daniel, the man who invented it, did a lot of research on pointe shoes and came up with a great formula designed specifically for dancers to repair, restore and renew dead pointe shoes.  You can use the glue in a variety of ways to help harden and uphold your shoes.

Most commonly, dancers will put the glue on the areas of their shoes that become soft. To get the best results, you have to let your shoes dry completely after wear. After they dry, you just apply the glue to the soft areas inside or outside of the shoe and again let them dry completely. Even though this glue seems like magic, it will not make your shoes brand new again–but it will give you the ability to continue to wear them for a while longer.

Another way to use help extend the wear of your shoes is to use the glue before you dance in them. Take your brand new shoes (before any wear) and put glue on the areas that tend to “die” quickly.  This will add an extra hardness to the areas that seem to need it, giving your shoes more life. As they soften, you can always re-apply more glue.

Keep in mind, if you are newer to pointe work, you’ll want to get your teachers advice before trying to glue your shoes on your own. You don’t want to ruin a pair of pointe shoes!

Save your shoes–try Daniel’s Pointe Shoe Glue.

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About Pointe Shoe Wool…

Today we’re running a post on something I was particularly excited about sharing with the dance community…wool for pointe shoes. When I was researching different topics for possible inclusion this month, I came across Pine Acres Woolstock, which is located in northwestern Wisconsin.

Pine Acres has a small flock of Romney/Rambouillet sheep, and the owner, Teresa Smit, processes some of their wool for use in pointe shoes. I reached out to her to learn more, and she was kind enough to tell us a bit about how wool is processed and prepared for use in pointe shoes…

  1.  Can you tell readers a little bit about how you got involved with producing pointe shoe wool?

I am really combining two loves from childhood. I grew up on a farm and am a country girl at heart. During my childhood I enjoyed 11 years of dance, including pointe, and understand the value of wool for padding the toes. Raising a flock of sheep now keeps me happily connected to both worlds.

  1. What is the process like of processing the wool for ballet dancers?

Softness and cleanliness are my two criteria for pointe wool. Softness in wool is determined by the breed of sheep. The Rambouillet breed produces soft, fine wool and is the basis for my pointe wool. The sheep are shorn once a year, usually in April. After shearing, a cover is placed on each sheep which is worn throughout the year. It is replaced with a larger one periodically as the wool grows. These coats protect the wool from the elements of weather and keep the fleeces nice and clean. After shearing, the wool is washed and sent to the woolen mill to be processed.

  1. What are some of the benefits of wool?

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